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Men's And Women's Compression Socks

Compression socks put more pressure on the legs and ankles than standard socks, but they look like socks or hoses. Some end at the ankle or calf, while others go all the way to the hip. They come in a variety of styles and sometimes have open toe areas. Prescription compression stockings that apply more pressure than over-the-counter medications can be used, and battery-powered varieties can apply different amounts of pressure at different times. Socks with higher mmHg apply more pressure.

What is the science behind compression socks?

Compression stockings put pressure on your legs and ankles. Compression increases blood flow to help prevent blood from pooling in the leg veins, which can lead to damage and clotting.

While compression therapy has been known for thousands of years - compression socks or stockings as we know them today did not appear until the late 1930s. For example, physicians in ancient Egypt used a primitive form of compression bandages to bandage and treat leg injuries, but it wasn't until World War II that German-born tool and mold maker Conrad Jobst Just needed something to relieve his leg pain and swelling from chronic venous insufficiency (CVI).

Jobster noticed that swimming helped his poor circulation and eased his discomfort, and attributed it to the gentle pressure of the water on his long-suffering legs. So he tried to create a stocking-like product that would simulate the gentle pressure of the legs - thus, the first compression stockings were born.

Compression socks - how they work

One of the most important factors in vein health is good circulation, especially in the legs. Poor circulation can lead to a range of problems, including spider veins, varicose veins, chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and even deep vein thrombosis (DVT). ) , compression stockings work by applying gentle but constant pressure to the legs, forcing blood up through the deep veins and back to the heart.

Although most people think of venous problems as an elderly disease, modern compression stockings are worn by people of all ages. For example, many athletes wear compression garments to help them perform at their best and promote faster recovery, while frequent travelers like airline pilots use them to combat DVT issues. Expectant mothers also wear compression stockings to help manage the risk of leg swelling during pregnancy. So while compression socks or stockings may not be particularly glamorous, they have several benefits. Let's take a closer look...

How does wearing compression stockings help?

Compression stockings can prevent leg fatigue and pain. They've also been shown to relieve swelling in the legs, feet, and ankles, and prevent -- and to some extent treat -- troublesome and annoying varicose and spider veins. They even prevent you from feeling dizzy or lightheaded while standing.

compression level

Modern compression garments come in a variety of styles, the most popular of which are designed for the lower body, such as compression socks or stockings. They have 5 compression levels, from light or mild to extra firm.

For example, mild compression garments can help those with healthy circulation but want to relieve minor symptoms such as swelling in the legs or ankles. They are especially good for those who spend a lot of time sitting or standing in one position and can usually buy over the counter.

Medium compression stockings are the most commonly worn type of compression garment and the type most recommended as an introduction by most doctors. Like mild compression stockings, they can be purchased from your local pharmacy and help fight swelling and relieve sore or tired extremities. In addition, however, tighter compressions can also relieve discomfort from other venous problems, including varicose veins, spider veins, and chronic venous insufficiency (CVI).

Sturdy compression stockings should only be worn if recommended by your doctor. They are worn primarily to help treat more serious limb conditions such as lymphedema, a sudden drop in blood pressure when standing (also known as orthostatic hypertension), management of problematic leg ulcers, and symptoms of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Performance.

Naturally, this level of compression will help with those minor issues like swelling and spiders/varicose veins, but people with more complex limb issues are more likely to wear firm compression garments.

The role of compression socks

Compression stockings increase blood flow by putting pressure on the veins in the feet and legs. The arteries that carry oxygenated blood to your feet and calves relax, allowing blood to flow freely and your heart doesn't have to struggle to bring blood back to your veins. This helps keep blood near the heart and head and prevents swelling in the feet. It also prevents foot pain in people who stand or walk most of the day.

Compression stockings increase blood flow by putting pressure on the veins in the feet and legs. The arteries that carry oxygenated blood to your feet and calves relax, allowing blood to flow freely and your heart doesn't have to struggle to bring blood back to your veins. This helps keep blood near the heart and head and prevents swelling in the feet. It also prevents foot pain in people who stand or walk most of the day.

Many doctors recommend compression stockings to treat edema or lymphedema, swelling of the lower extremities that is a common symptom of diabetes. Compression stockings can also help reduce varicose and spider veins or prevent them from getting worse. These blue or purple veins occur when a valve in a blood vessel fails, allowing blood to concentrate in one place or flow to your feet instead of your head.

Too many varicose veins or blood clots can lead to venous insufficiency, where the veins are unable to carry blood efficiently to the heart. This can cause orthostatic hypotension, or low blood pressure, that can make a person feel dizzy or even faint after standing up suddenly. Compression stockings can help with this by preventing excess blood in the legs and feet. People also often wear compression stockings during pregnancy to help with swelling of the feet.

Compression stockings can help prevent deep vein thrombosis, a type of blood clot that occurs in a large vein. It can cause pain, swelling, muscle damage, and even death. Pregnant women and people who have recently had surgery are at greater risk. Deep vein thrombosis can also occur on long-haul planes when people have to sit still for long periods of time.

These socks can also help you avoid phlebitis. Phlebitis is a blood clot in a smaller vein near the surface of the skin that can cause pain, fever, swelling, and a lump in the skin near the clot. It's not as serious as deep vein thrombosis, but both problems can cause blood clots to travel from the leg to another organ. For example, a pulmonary embolism is a blood clot in the lungs that makes it difficult or impossible to breathe.

Can everyone wear compression socks?

Compression stockings are generally safe. But they are not the right treatment option for everyone. If you have certain medical conditions, it is best to consult a healthcare provider before using compression therapy. Some of these conditions include:

  • peripheral arterial disease
  • Massive edema due to heart failure
  • Neuropathy or other sensory disturbance
  • serious skin disease or infection, such as cellulitis

How many hours a day should you wear compression stockings?

If you have a prescription, your graded compression stockings will be professionally fitted. Your healthcare provider can explain how long you should wear it.

Many reports suggest that you can treat or prevent vein problems by wearing compression stockings throughout the day, except when bathing or sleeping.

It is important to note that this information may not apply to everyone. So even if you don't have a prescription, it's a good idea to talk to your healthcare provider. This way, you can get guidance on compression garments and how to use them based on your medical history and health needs.